Marcia Strykowski

Category Archives: Books

How to Use Goodreads

Originally posted on WRITERS' RUMPUS:
Goodreads is the best method I’ve found to keep track of my reading. This site can also help you discover new books to read. There’ll always be a few naysayers for any online program, and yes, sometimes a few bad apples spoil the fun, but overall I feel Goodreads (ages…

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A Visit with Emily Dickinson

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886). A few months back I was able to visit Amherst, Mass., where Emily lived and wrote most of her amazing poetry. Only a handful of her poems were published during her lifetime, but she left behind hundreds for future generations to enjoy. Her first collection was published in 1890 …

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My New Book News!

I’m very excited to announce I’ll have a new middle-grade novel (ages 9-14) coming out within a year or two (release date still to be determined). Roller Boy is about Mateo Garcia, a young city boy who wants desperately to be good at something —something that will take him from that skinny little kid with the big hair to someone …

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The Tiniest Books

After enjoying your comments on my Tiny Books post, I decided to do a post on even tinier books. These first pictures show books I’ve had since childhood. All are hardcover with book jackets. First up is the Christmas Nutshell Library by Hilary Knight. This cute little boxed set includes 4 tiny books, each 2 1/2″ x …

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Tiny Books

In an age of tiny houses (all the rage in USA and Canada) and tiny food (very popular in Japan), I’ve been thinking about how we also have tiny books. The librarian who orders nonfiction at my library is rather petite and seems to like small things, so at first I thought she might feel …

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E. B. White

Elwyn Brooks White was born on July 11, 1899, in Mount Vernon, New York. In a 1980 article from the New York Times he discusses his name: “I never liked Elwyn. My mother just hung it on me because she’d run out of names. I was her sixth child.” Later, at Cornell University, he was called …

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